Lord Of The Flies Essay Civilization

“We’ve got to have rules and obey them,” (Golding, 42). Now that Ralphs source of power has been destroyed there is nothing to stop Jack from being chief.

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At the same time, The Lord of the Flies, which is an offering to the mythical "beast" on the island, is increasingly invested with significance as a symbol of the dominance of savagery on the island, and of Jack's authority over the other boys.

The Lord of the Flies represents the unification of the boys under Jack's rule as motivated by fear of "outsiders": the beast and those who refuse to accept Jack's authority.

The rift between civilization and savagery is also communicated through the novel's major symbols: the conch shell, which is associated with Ralph, and The Lord of the Flies, which is associated with Jack.

The conch shell is a powerful marker of democratic order on the island, confirming both Ralph's leadership-determined by election-and the power of assembly among the boys.

Rather, it is when Jack refuses to recognize the validity of society and rejects Ralph's authority that the dangerous aspects of his character truly emerge.

Golding suggests that while savagery is perhaps an inescapable fact of human existence, civilization can mitigate its full expression.is the conflict between the human impulse towards savagery and the rules of civilization which are designed to contain and minimize it.Throughout the novel, the conflict is dramatized by the clash between Ralph and Jack, who respectively represent civilization and savagery.Jack's initial desire to kill pigs to demonstrate his bravery, for example, is channeled into the hunt, which provides needed food for the entire group.As long as he lives within the rules of civilization, Jack is not a threat to the other boys; his impulses are being re-directed into a productive task.In a state of prolonged anguish and panic, what is one truly capable of?Can one remain sophisticated or will the temptation of their dark subconscious take over, bringing out the barbarianism which exists in us all?The differing ideologies are expressed by each boy's distinct attitudes towards authority.While Ralph uses his authority to establish rules, protect the good of the group, and enforce the moral and ethical codes of the English society the boys were raised in, Jack is interested in gaining power over the other boys to gratify his most primal impulses.Golding's emphasis on the negative consequences of savagery can be read as a clear endorsement of civilization.In the early chapters of the novel, he suggests that one of the important functions of civilized society is to provide an outlet for the savage impulses that reside inside each individual.

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