Essays On Race

Essays On Race-67
Those who accepted this view believed that God’s “curse” on Cain was the mark of a dark skin.

In theology and practice, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints embraces the universal human family.

Latter-day Saint scripture and teachings affirm that God loves all of His children and makes salvation available to all.

Those realities, though unfamiliar and disturbing today, influenced all aspects of people’s lives, including their religion.

Many Christian churches of that era, for instance, were segregated along racial lines.

Latter-day Saints attend Church services according to the geographical boundaries of their local ward, or congregation.

By definition, this means that the racial, economic, and demographic composition of Mormon congregations generally mirrors that of the wider local community.

Nevertheless, given the long history of withholding the priesthood from men of black African descent, Church leaders believed that a revelation from God was needed to alter the policy, and they made ongoing efforts to understand what should be done.

After praying for guidance, President Mc Kay did not feel impressed to lift the ban.

Jane Manning James, a faithful black member who crossed the plains and lived in Salt Lake City until her death in 1908, similarly asked to enter the temple; she was allowed to perform baptisms for the dead for her ancestors but was not allowed to participate in other ordinances.

The curse of Cain was often put forward as justification for the priesthood and temple restrictions.

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