Creative Problem Solving In School Mathematics

Stacey (Eds.): Problem solving-A World View, 225-234, Nottingham: Shell Center.

Middle-grade preservice teachers' mathematical problem solving and problem posing. Savic, M., Karakok, G., Tang G., Turkey, H., & Naccarato, E. Formative Assessment of Creativity in Undergraduate Mathematics: Using a Creativity-in-Progress Rubric (CPR) on Proving.

The article presents author's approaches to the differentiation of creative mathematical tasks for basic school students in accordance with the systemic scale, which were formed by adaptation of creative problem solutions classified in terms of their degree of difficulty and the quality of the obtained results, considered in the theory of inventive problems solving. Learners' responses to the demands of conceptual change: considerations for the effective nature of science instruction.

The author proposes a system of requirements for the creative mathematical problem such as the contradiction in the condition of the problem, the sufficiency of the condition, the rectitude of the question, the independence of facts, the completeness of information, and scientific consistency.

Archives Current issue Announcement About About us Aims and Scope Abstracting and Indexing Editorial Office Open Access Policy Publication Ethics Journal History Publisher Contact Follow us: Facebook Follow us: Twitter For Authors Editorial Policy Peer Review Policy Manuscript Preparation Guidelines Copyright & Licencing Publication Fees Fee Waiver Policy for Doctoral Students Payment Methods Best Paper Award EJMSTE Language Editing Service Submit Article More EJMSTE Best Reviewer Award Statistics Call for Editors & Editorial Board Members Call for Reviewers Special Issue Announcements Published Special Issues Special Issues Special Issue Announcements Published Special Issues Just Accepted Editorial Policy Peer Review Policy Manuscript Preparation Guidelines Copyright & Licencing Publication Fees Fee Waiver Policy for Doctoral Students Payment Methods Best Paper Award EJMSTE Language Editing Service Submit Article For Authors Editorial Policy Peer Review Policy Manuscript Preparation Guidelines Copyright & Licencing Publication Fees Fee Waiver Policy for Doctoral Students Payment Methods Best Paper Award EJMSTE Language Editing Service Submit Article The purpose of the study is to reveal a method that will help arrange creative mathematical problems for the development of creative competences of the basic school students.

The main method here is modeling of creative mathematical problems taking into account the complexity levels of the tasks in accordance with the systemic scale and the requirements for the formulation of creative tasks in basic school. The system of requirements allows to preserve the didactic value of the proposed mathematical problem. As a result of experimental research and experiential teaching using creative mathematical tasks, the proposed differentiation and the system of requirements for the condition were successfully tested. Creative model construction in scientists and students: The role of imagery, analogy, and mental simulation. During the early development of creativity research, the structure of creativity was measured via divergent thinking tests and has gradually come to be equated with divergent thinking [11, 13].However, divergent thinking tests have been evidenced to have poor reliability and weak predictive validity [15].That contributes greatly to the development of creative competencies of students in the basic school and their ability to solve creative math problems. An Investigation of Basic Design Capacity Performance in Different Background Students. Practical use of creative mathematical problems makes it possible to increase schoolchildren’s interest to study mathematics and show interdisciplinary connections with various disciplines, e.g., informatics, chemistry, biology. EURASIA Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 13(5), 1177-1187. Some researchers believe the process of creativity actually constitutes the whole of the problem-solving process, from problem finding to executing a plan [10].Guilford [11] associated creativity with problem-solving and identified four stages of the creative process: (1) recognition of an existing problem; (2) production of a number of relevant ideas; (3) recognition of various possibilities produced; and (4) the drawing of appropriate conclusions that lead to the solution.Houtz [12] believed that Torrance’s definition of creativity, defined as “the process of sensing gaps or disturbing, missing elements; forming ideas or hypotheses concerning them; testing these hypotheses and communicating the results, possibly modifying and retesting the hypotheses” [13, p.16], is similar to the process of problem finding and problem-solving, because creativity can be exercised while solving open-ended and ill-defined problems.

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